M. Desiree Aldeis

Lecturer
Interpersonal Communication

Office Location

SSMS 4011

Specialization

Interpersonal and Relational Communication, Family Communication

Bio

Desiree is currently a full-time lecturer in the Department of Communication. Desiree’s dissertation examined the impact that putative secrets, or a secret that has been discovered unbeknownst to the secret-keeper, have on romantic relationships over time. Her research interests also include family communication and relational communication with a special interest in exploring the ‘dark side’ of these close relationships. Desiree also received her Master’s degree (MA) in Interpersonal Communication from UCSB in 2009 and prior to that, she attended the University of Texas at Austin received her Bachelor of Science (BS) degree in Communication Studies in 2003.

Publications

Publications

Afifi, T. D., Granger, D., Joseph, A., Denes, A., & Aldeis, D. (2011) Parents’ communication skills and adolescents’ salivary alpha-amylase and cortisol response patterns. Communication Monographs, 78, 273-295.

Afifi, T. D., Joseph, A., & Aldeis, D. (2008). Why can’t we just talk about it? An observational study of parents’ and adolescents’ conversations about sex. Journal of Adolescent Research, 23, 689-721.

Afifi, T. D., Joseph, A., & Aldeis, D. (2012). The ‘standards for openness hypothesis’: Why women find (conflict) avoidance more dissatisfying than men. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 29, 102-125.

Afifi, T.D., Granger, D., Denes, A., Joseph, A., & Aldeis, D. (Revise and resubmit). Interparental Conflict and Parents’ Inappropriate Disclosures: Relations to Parents’ and Children’s Salivary ?-Amylase and Cortisol. Communication Research.

Afifi. T. D., Aldeis, D., & Joseph, A. (2009). Family conflict. In D. Canary & B. Cupach (Eds.), Competence in interpersonal conflict (2nd Ed.). Waveland Press, Inc.

Aldeis, D. & Afifi, T. D. (Revise and resubmit). Putative secrets and conflict in romantic relationships over time. Communication Monographs.

Aldeis, D., & Afifi, T. D. (2013) College students’ willingness to reveal risky behaviors: The influence of relationship type, message type, and self-esteem. Journal of Family Communication, 13, 92-113.

Denes, A., Afifi, T. D., Granger, D., Joseph, A., & Aldeis, D. (Forthcoming). Interparental Conflict and Parents’ Inappropriate Disclosures: Relations to Parents’ and Children’s Salivary ?-Amylase and Cortisol. In J. Honeycutt, C. Sawyer, and S. Keaton (Eds.), The influence of communication in physiology and health status. Peter Lang Publishing.

Conference Papers

Afifi, T.D., Granger, D., Denes, A., Joseph, A., & Aldeis, D. (2009, November). Interparental Conflict and Parents’ Inappropriate Disclosures: Relations to Parents’ and Children’s Salivary ?-Amylase and Cortisol. Top Paper Award in Interpersonal Division at the annual conference of the National Communication Association, Chicago, IL.

Afifi, T. D., Joseph, A., & Aldeis, D. (2010, November). Why can’t you open up to me? The associations among conflict avoidance, rumination, and relationship satisfaction. Paper presented in the Interpersonal Communication Division at the annual conference of the National Communication Association, San Francisco, CA.

Aldeis, D., & Afifi, T. D. (2010, November). College students’ willingness to reveal risky behaviors: The influence of relationship type, message type, and self-esteem. Paper presented in the Family Communication Division at the annual conference of the National Communication Association, San Francisco, CA.

Afifi, T. D., Granger, D., Joseph, A., Denes, A., & Aldeis, D. (2010, November). Parents’ Communication Skills and Adolescents’ Salivary Alpha-Amylase and Cortisol Response Patterns. Paper presented in the Interpersonal Communication Division at the annual conference of the National Communication Association, San Francisco, CA.

Afifi, T. D., Joseph, A., & Aldeis, D. (2010, November). The ‘Standards for Openness Hypothesis’: Why Women Find (Conflict) Avoidance More Dissatisfying than Men. Paper presented in the Interpersonal Communication Division at the annual conference of the National Communication Association, San Francisco, CA.

Courses

Teaching

University of California, Santa Barbara

Lecturer

Family Communication (COMM 124)

Interpersonal Communication (COMM 107)

Teaching Associate

The Dark Side of Interpersonal Communication (COMM 160)

Teaching Assistant

Lower Division Communication courses (with sections)

Introduction to Communication (COMM 1)

Communication Research Methods (COMM 88)

Theories of Communication (COMM 89)

Upper Division Communication courses

Interpersonal Communication (COMM 107)

Language and Social Identity (COMM 109)

Nonverbal Communication (COMM 111)

Family Communication (COMM 124)

Gender and Communication (COMM 126)

Advanced Interpersonal/Relational Communication (COMM 151)

Peace and Communication (COMM 162)

Santa Barbara City College

Adjunct Professor

Interpersonal Communication (COMM 121)